top of page

BLACK HISTORY
ON THIS DAY IN SEPTEMBER!

SEPTEMBER 1, 1994:

The United States Postal Service issued the Nat "King" Cole stamp.

 

SEPTEMBER 2, 1956:

Tennessee National Guard was sent to Clinton, Tennessee to put an end to white mobs demonstrating against school integration.

 

 

SEPTEMBER 3, 1838:

Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery. He posed as a sailor and boarded a train bound for Philadelphia.

 

SEPTEMBER 4, 1875:

The Clinton Massacre began in Clinton, Mississippi at a Republican meeting. The meeting was interrupted by White Democrats who opened gunfire.

SEPTEMBER 5, 1859:

Harriet Wilson became the first African-American woman to publish a novel in the United States.

 

SEPTEMBER 6, 1960:

Rafer Johnson became the first African American to win an Olympic Decathlon

 

 

SEPTEMBER 7, 1986:

Desmond Tutu became the first black archbishop of Cape Town, South Africa.

 

 

SEPTEMBER 8, 1993:

Joycelyn Elders became surgeon general of the Public Health Service, appointed by President Bill Clinton. Dr. Elders was the first African American to serve as surgeon general. 

 

 

SEPTEMBER 9, 1979:

Robert Guillaume won an Emmy for best supporting actor in a comedy series for his role in the show "Soap."

 

 

SEPTEMBER 10, 1990:

The Fresh Prince of Belair, a sitcom about a young black male from Philadelphia who went to live with his family in Bel-Air, aired for the first time.

 

 

SEPTEMBER 11, 1959:

Duke Ellington gets the Springarn Medal for his musical achievements.

 

SEPTEMBER 12, 1987:

"It's Showtime at the Apollo" aired for the first time. 

 

SEPTEMBER 13, 1981:

Isabel Sanford won an Emmy award as best comedic actress for "The Jeffersons".

 

 

SEPTEMBER 14, 2016:

Dr.  Carla Hayden was sworn in as the 14th Librarian of Congress. She was the third professional librarian, the first woman, and the first Black to hold the position.

 

SEPTEMBER 15, 1963:

A bomb exploded during Sunday morning services in the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four young girls.

 

SEPTEMBER 16, 1940:

President Roosevelt signs the Selective Training and Service Act.

 

 

SEPTEMBER 17, 1983:

New York's Vanessa Williams was crowned the first Black Miss America at age 20. 

SEPTEMBER 18, 1895:

Booker T. Washington delivered his famous "Atlanta Compromise" speech at the opening of the Cotton States and International Exhibition in Atlanta, Georgia.

 

SEPTEMBER 19, 1868:

The Camilla Massacre took place near Albany, Georgia.

 

SEPTEMBER 20, 1987:

Alfr Woodard won her second Emmy award for Outstanding Guest Performer in a Drama Series.

 

 

SEPTEMBER 21, 1872:

John Henry Conyers became the first Black student at Annapolis Naval Academy.

 

SEPTEMBER 22, 1989:

Family Matters, a sitcom about a Black Family in Chicago, premiered. The show lasted for nine seasons.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1957:

The LIttle Rock Nine entered Central High. With the help of police escorts, the students successfully entered teh school through a side entrance. However, because of the angry white mob they did not stay the full day.

 

 

SEPTEMBER 24, 2016:

The National Museum of African American History and Culture opened as the newest Smithsonian Institution museum along Washington, D.C's National Mall. 

 

 

SEPTEMBER 25, 1962:

Sonny Liston beat Floyd Patterson to become the heavyweight champion.

 

SEPTEMBER 26, 1962:

On or close to this day, A. Leon Higginbotham became a member of the five-man Federal Trade Commission, which made him the first African American ever to be appointed to a federal regulatory agency. 

 

 

SEPTEMBER 27, 1950:

Charles H. Houston was awarded the Springarn Medal posthumously for his pioneering work in developing the NAACP legal campaign.

 

 

SEPTEMBER 28, 1868:

The Opelousa's Massacre occurred when whites sought after Black voters. 

 

SEPTEMBER 29, 1975:

WGPR-TV, the nation's first Black owned and operated television station, was founded in Detroit, Michigan.

 

SEPTEMBER 30, 1962:

A riot broke out at University's of Mississippi when a deal was reached for James Meredith to be the first Black to enroll. A mob of angry whites confronted U.S. Marshalls that stationed on campus to protect Meredith. James Meredith was able to register the next day on October 1.

 

bottom of page